Remote Lab Access and Control

A requirement I’ve quickly come to realize with building my lab is remote access into lab my equipment. This requirement is two fold, I don’t feel like always sitting in my basement to build topologies and I’m not always home when I will be studying. This need naturally led me to acquiring a terminal server, which was very helpful in fulfilling my first need of not having to always hang out in the basement when studying. I didn’t like the idea of always leaving my lab equipment on wasn’t exciting to me as I don’t like wasting electricity, so I found a Remote Power Control (RPC) unit also known as a switched PDU.

I enjoyed setting everything up so I figured I’d share the configuration steps I took to get two devices communicating with each other and functioning. The two devices I used were a Opengear IM7200 terminal server and a Avocent (Cyclades) PM10. The setup is pretty straightforward with minimal steps.

First you need to make sure the RPC unit is cable properly, for the PM10 a serial console connection is made of a UTP straight through cable from one of the serial ports on the Opengear terminal server to the “In” port on the PM10. You can daisy chain multiple PM10s together by going from the “out” port to the “in” port on the next PM10, but I recommend setting up each PM10 as an individual serial port on the terminal server. This gives more flexible control and you won’t lose multiple RPCs if you have a failure “up stream” in the daisy chain. After the cabling is taken care of its time to move on to the fun part, configuration!

The first configuration component is to configure the serial port on the IM7200 to the PM10. To do so navigate to the Serial Port configuration section: ynwxbpg

The next step is to configure the serial port connected to the PM10 by editing the port on the IM7200:um6g9qy

The following settings are specific to the PM10 connection and need to be configured on the serial port on the IM7200 for connectivity:rbf9hxzoihsmtcSettings include:

  • Label – Port name you would like
  • Baud Rate – 9600
  • Data Bits – 8
  • Parity – None
  • Stop bits – 1
  • Flow control – None
  • Port Pinout – Cisco Straight (X1)
  • Terminal Type – ansi

In addition to the required serial settings, the serial port must be set to a device type of “RPC” so that the terminal server knows how to handle the port:r8igm0v

Next navigate to the RPC configuration under Serial & Networks:mj3mucf

Next click on ” Add RPC”:ijx5dch

Next setup the RPC configuration on the IM7200 withe the following settings:dly8d0pSettings include:

  • Connected via – Serial Port previously configured
  • RPC Type – Cyclades PM10
  • Name – Whatever you would like to name it
  • Outlets (optional) – set it to 10 or leave it as default for auto-probing
  • Username / Password – Set to admin/password for PM10
  • Log Status – Enabled (Checked)
  • Log Rate – Setting you would like

The next step is to configure serial ports connected to console ports on the devices controlled by the RPC with the Power Menu enabled:twmrllo

The last step is to setup a Managed Device for each device to be controlled by the RPC, to do so navigate to “Managed Devices” under Serial & Networks:kawabbv

Click “Add Device”:fr3x9gy

Finally configure the device with a name, assigned console port, and assigned RPC port:f8ohwtg

After configuration the devices can be managed under devices:tlbf8dt

Or right from the console sessions via the terminal server:yla5om8

Happy labbing!

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Hiding (filtering) a specific user from reporting in Cisco ISE

I ran into an interesting problem preparing for an 802.1x deployment – the authentications report in Cisco ISE was full of all the network devices checking to make sure ISE was still available (health checks). As seen below the load balancer’s keep alive fill the logs pretty much on their own, imagine trying to troubleshoot a login issue!1 YUCK!

Something else I found interesting that my Google Foo (or knowledge of ACS and how to filter out a certain user) was no match for trying to find a solution for my issue. Because of this, I decided a quick how-to on this would be helpful (I can’t be the only person who will want to filter out such an annoying problem).

First Navigate to Administration > System > Logging:2

Once in the System Settings for Logging, navigate to “Collection Filters”:3

At this point, the rest is pretty straight forward. But for completeness I am going to finish the whole process, so click “Add”:4

After that just fill in the type of attribute you want to filter (Username, Policy Set Name, NAS IP Address, Device IP Address, or MAC Address), the Value for the selected attribute, and the Filter Type (Filter All, Filter Passed, FIlter Failed, or Bypass Suppression [with time limit]). Finally, click “Submit”!

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For me, it made the most sense to filter the username used for the monitors, and to only filter on passes for that username. This allows me to use the least amount of filters, and if a health monitor fails for any reason will show up in the reporting still.

Final result (don’t mind the old logs, I was too impatient to wait for them to clear):

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Happy troubleshooting!